ice on leaf

Spring is in the air? Your complete garden planning guide

As we prepare to turn the calendar page from February to March, nature seems to be giving us mixed signals as to the immediacy of the rumored arrival of spring.

A little of this, a little of that
Spring begins officially on March 20, 2014. The time of the year where every garden is destined for abundance and beauty. When the thrill of planting is almost a reality, and the long hot days of summer weeding, drought, and pests is still a distant bad memory repressed in the deepest regions of our gardening minds. During the past few weeks, there have times when on a given day it was snowing in 48 of the 50 states, and times when many parts of the country were experiencing unseasonably warm temperatures. The kind that made one want to throw on some shorts, grab a trough, and start planting.

Get Started
So, as at least our thoughts start to turn to spring, now is the time to take stock of our yards and make plans for our warm season garden. So grab a cold drink and find some shade, or huddle over a hot cup of cocoa and put on a warm sweater depending on what these unpredictable mornings hold, and let’s get started. By planning, and where appropriate planting now, your landscape and garden will be ready to flourish in the months to come.

Clean it Up
The best way to start getting your garden ready for spring is to clean it up. Remove any dead or spent plants from the garden and, if they are not diseased, add them to your compost pile. Pull any weeds that may have started to take hold. Once you’ve cleaned up, you will want to amend your soil by adding compost to garden beds and tilling it in. This will help replace nutrients taken up by the previous planting.

Draw a Plan
Grab a pencil and some paper and draw a diagram of your yard. You don’t need a degree in art or an expensive software program to draw a rough sketch of your landscape and garden plan. If you have the original survey from when you bought your house, make a copy of it and use that as a starting point. If not, just make a rough sketch of the footprint of your home. Draw in existing landscape features, and planned garden areas. Indicate which way is north and make note of any shady or poorly drained areas.

Plant What you Like
When planning what vegetables to plant, it’s easy to get carried away and want to grow everything under the sun. It’s always fun to try something new, but focus on growing what you really like. Make a list of the warm season vegetables for your area that your family likes and rank them from most to least liked. Plan on planting what you like. If no one in your family likes lima beans or squash, for example, then plan on planting more of what is most appealing.

Can, Store, or Eat
Once you know what you want to plant, decide what the intended use for each vegetable and herb will be. Do you plan on canning enough to last through the winter? Will you be freezing or dehydrating? Or, will you just eat and enjoy what you harvest this spring and summer. Different varieties of many vegetables are better suited to a specific purpose such as canning. Do your research.

Don’t Forget the Flowers
When planning your vegetable garden, it’s easy to overlook the importance of flowers. Look at your landscape as a whole and determine what native or locally adapted flowers are best suited to the different areas of your yard based on their color, size, water requirements, and the amount of sun needed. Flowers are an attractive, and highly effective way of drawing pollinators into the yard and garden.

Add New Beds
Now that you know what you will be planting and what your harvest will be used for, you can determine how much of each variety you should plant. Look at your existing bed space and any areas of your yard that you may want to convert to garden beds. For new beds, avoid low-lying, poorly drained areas. Clear the ground, till and amend the soil now. Better yet, try raised beds. They are a great way to avoid having to deal with the rock filled soil around here, and will maximize your harvest in the space available.

Order Seeds Now
As soon as you’ve determined which vegetables, what varieties, and how many of each you will be planting, go ahead and buy your seeds now. This will ensure that you get exactly what you want and have them ready to plant when the time arrives; however, wait until just before planting to purchase transplants. Be sure to check out the comprehensive How Do Gardener Seed Source Guide.

Know When to Plant
One of the most important factors in having a successful home garden is planting each vegetable at just the right time. Here in Central Texas, The Williamson County Texas AgriLife Extension Service recommends the following:

[ Spring Planting Dates for Central Texas ]

- Asparagus: After February 1
- Beans, snap bush: March 5 – May 1
- Beans, snap pole: March 5 – April 15
- Beans, Lima bush: March 15 – April 15
- Beans, Lima pole: March 15- April 15
- Chard, Swiss: February 1 – March 10
- Collards: February 1 – March 25
- Corn: February 25 – May 1
- Cucumbers: March 5 – May 1
- Eggplant: March 15 – May 1
- Lettuce: February 1 – March 15
- Cantaloupe: March 15 – May 1
- Mustard: February 1 – April 1
- Peas, southern: March 25 – May 20
- Peppers (transplant): March 15 – May 1
- Potato, sweet (slips): April 10 – May 15
- Pumpkin: April 1 – April 20
- Radish: February 1 – May 1
- Squash, summer: March 5 – May 1
- Tomato (transplant): March 15 – April 10
- Turnip: February 1 – March 10
- Watermelon: March 15 – May 1

- Note: The planting dates for your geographic area will vary -

To find the appropriate spring planting dates for your specific area, check with your local Cooperative Extension Agency, or refer to our Planting Guides for Fruits and Vegetables on the top menu.

Don’t Lose Track of Today
Well, there you have it. It may seem like a lot of work, and it probably is, but if you haven’t already done so, now is the time to start getting ready for your spring garden. Sometimes it’s easy to become overwhelmed by everything that will need to be done in the garden this time of the year, but remember to enjoy each day on its own merit. So don’t let the anticipation, or dread, of your spring garden, and the promise of warmer temperatures yet to come, distract you from today. Remember, “To everything there is a season.”

Purple_Fountain_Grass_(Pennisetum_setaceum)_in_Hyderabad,_AP_W_IMG_7797

Ornamental Grasses: Adding Interest to your Landscape

When the words grass and gardening are mentioned together, most of us think of getting out the lawn mower for another long hot day of mowing the front yard. But ornamental grasses offer gardeners something entirely different from traditional turf grass.

There are over 20 varieties of native and adapted ornamental grasses in Texas alone, ranging in size from a few inches to several feet in height and width. They come in colors ranging from silver-gray to deep blue-green in the spring and summer, and in the fall and winter can turn anywhere from a light tan to deep rust color.

Ornamental grasses are an excellent way of adding visual interest, color, texture, height, movement, and even sound to a landscape throughout the year. Their exceptional hardiness, drought tolerance, adaptability to a wide variety of soils, and pest and disease resistance make them a great addition to any landscape.

Most ornamental grasses will grow to their full height in about 3 months, making them an inexpensive and quick way to make a dramatic, yet typically long lived impact on a landscape.

Ornamental grasses can be used in many ways in the landscape. Larger varieties can be used as a specimen plant. Use them in a border, as a hedge or as a screen. Ornamental grasses make a great backdrop for roses and other perennials, or try planting a single variety in large clusters for a dramatic effect. In the fall and winter, use dormant ornamental grass cuttings in flower arrangements.

Now is the time to think about where you can use ornamental grasses in your landscape this coming spring. Check out the table below for several varieties you may find of interest. However you decide to use ornamental grasses in your landscape, you’ll be pleasantly surprised with the results.

Don’t forget to check our Plant Hardiness Zones Tool, in the How Do Gardener Tool Shed, to find your USDA Plant Hardiness zone.

Little Bluestem
Schizachyrium scoparium

Habit: Perennial

Exposure: Sun, Partial-Sun

Height: 2' - 3'

Width: 18" - 36"

USDA Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
Inland Sea Oats
Chasmanthium latifolium

Habit: Perennial

Exposure: Sun, Partial-Sun, Shade

Height: 1' - 3'

Width: 1' - 2"

USDA Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9
Muhly Grasses
Muhlenbergia spp.

Habit: Perennial

Exposure: Sun, Partial-Sun

Height: Varies by species, 2' - 6'

Width: 3' - 6'

USDA Hardiness Zones: 6,7,8,9,10
Dwarf Pampas Grass
Cortaderia selloana


Habit: Perennial

Exposure: Sun, Partial-Sun

Height: 5' - 6'

Width: 5' - 6"

USDA Hardiness Zones: 7,8,9,10,11
Chinese Silver Grass
Miscanthus sinensis

Habit: Perennial

Exposure: Sun, Partial-Sun

Height: 18" - 5'

Width: 1' - 3'

USDA Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9,10
Annual Fountain Grass
Pennisetum setaceum

Habit: Annual

Exposure: Sun, Partial-Sun

Height: 3' - 4'

Width: 18" - 30"

USDA Hardiness Zones: 9,10,11

potatoes

Potatoes

Overview
The Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a member of the Nightshade family of plants. The edible part of the potato plant is called a tuber, not a root, and there are many different varieties of red, white, yellow, russet, and even purple or blue potatoes. Potatoes originated in South America, and were grown as a food crop by the Incas as early as 3,000 BC. The Spanish conquistadors brought the potato back to Spain around 1530, and it was introduced to the United States in 1719 when Irish immigrants brought it with them to New Hampshire. French fries were first introduced to the United States when Thomas Jefferson served them in the White House during his presidency in 1804.

Nutrition Facts
Potatoes are nutrient-rich vegetables, full of carbohydrates.
Serving Size: 5 oz. Potato (baked or boiled with skin)
Calories…… 150
Recommended Daily Values:
Vitamin C…. 45%
Potassium…. 21%
Thiamin…… 10%
Niacin……. 8%
Vitamin B6… 14%
Folacin…… 14%
Fiber…….. 3 grams
Fat………. 0 grams
Protein…… 4 grams
They also contain smaller amounts of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and pantothenic acid.

Soil Preparation
Potatoes grow best in full sun in loose, slightly acidic soil that is well drained. Before planting potatoes, remove all rocks, trash and weeds from the planting area and till the soil to a depth of 8 to 12 inches. To help prevent disease, be sure to practice proper crop rotation by NOT planting potatoes in soil in which potatoes, or any other member of the Nightshade family such as tomatoes, peppers, or eggplant, were grown in the past two years.

Seed Preparation
Unlike most vegetables, potatoes are not grown from seeds but from potatoes that were grown the previous season, seed potatoes. Always use certified disease-free seed potatoes that are free of chemicals. Do not use potatoes from the grocery store for planting.

The “eyes” on the seed potato are actually buds that, when planted, will sprout into new potato plants. Cut large seed potatoes into pieces about the size of an egg, and having at least one good eye. Cut the seed potatoes 5 or 6 days before they are to be planted and let them sit in a cool, well-ventilated area to heal, or cure, in order to help prevent rotting once planted.

Planting
Potatoes are cool-season herbaceous perennials that are grown as an annual. Potatoes can be planted once the soil temperature 5” deep has reached 50 degrees F, or about 3 weeks before the last spring frost. In some areas, a fall crop can be planted about 110 days before the first frost. They grow best when daytime temperatures are around 65 to 70 degrees F.

Photo © Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Plant the seed potato pieces to a depth of 3 inches with the pieces spaced about 10 to 12 inches apart and the eye facing up. Sprouts from the seed potatoes will emerge in 2 to 4 weeks. As the new potato plants grow, regularly pile dirt up around the base of the plants to just below the leaves. This is done because new potatoes only grow in the soil area above the seed potato piece and below the top level of the soil. Be sure to keep the new tubers covered with soil to prevent them from turning green.

Potatoes can be easily grown in raised beds, baskets, barrels, or stacks of old tires where additional soil can be continuously piled up around the plants as they grow. Just be sure that the container is well drained.

Potato plants usually produce flowers and, and sometimes small fruit, that are attractive but should not be eaten.

- See Chart Below for Recommended Varieties -

Fertilizing
Potatoes prefer an acidic soil with a pH between 4.8 and 5.5. Apply a complete 10-20-10 fertilizer to the soil just before planting. After the seed potatoes sprout, fertilize your plants once a week with an application of a balanced fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro Vegetable Food.

Watering
Once planted, water the potatoes regularly to keep the soil evenly moist. Potatoes need at least 1 inch of water per week. Water early in the morning to allow plants to dry quickly and reduce the opportunity for disease infection. Drip irrigation is recommended to allow the water to get right to the growing tubers.

Weed Control
Keep the garden free from weeds, as weeds will compete with the growing potatoes for soil nutrients and water. Do not dig too deep when using a hoe, or pulling weeds to avoid damaging the tubers.

Insects
The lava of the Colorado potato beetle are red, or light orange with two rows of black dots on each side, while the adult has black and yellow stripes. Both are about 3/8 of an inch long and feed on the leaves of the potato plant. The best way to remove them is to hand pick them from the plants.

Aphids are small, whitish insects that may be found in masses on the underside of leaves. If present, leaves become yellow, sticky with honeydew. Hose off underside of leaves to knock off aphids.

Wireworms are thin, about ½ to 1½ inches long, worms with a dark head and tail that feed on the carrot root. Apply a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) based insecticide to control them.

Leafhoppers are green wedge shaped insects about 1/8 of an inch long. They will suck the juices from leaves causing them to curl upward and turn yellow or brown. They can be hosed off of the plants with a hard stream of water.

Diseases
Diseases and fungus may be a problem for potatoes during cool, wet weather. Check your plants regularly and when needed, treat with Neem oil, sulfur, or an applicable fungicide.

Harvesting
Potatoes will be ready to harvest in about 95 to 110 days, when the tops of the plant begin to die and each potato weighs from 6 to 12 ounces. You can harvest small “new potatoes” during the growing season by carefully digging beside the plant with your fingers. To harvest mature potatoes, use a spading fork to dig under the plant, 8 to 10 inches out from the stem, then pry the entire plant out of the ground and shake off any loose soil.

Storing
Carefully pull the potatoes from the vine and store them in a cool dry place with plenty of air circulation and a temperature of about 40 to 50 degrees F. Do NOT store them in the refrigerator and Do NOT wash them before storing them. Potatoes may be stored in an underground root cellar, and under the right storage conditions will keep for two to three months.

Recommended Varieties
The following chart list the recommended varieties, days to harvest, spring planting dates, and where applicable, the fall planting dates for carrots in each state, Wherever possible, the information in the chart is in accordance with the Cooperative Extension for each state.

StateVariety
- Days to Harvest
Spring
Planting Dates
Fall
Planting Dates
Alabama (AL)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Red LaSoda
• Red Pontiac
• Sebago
• Superior
Feb. 1 - Feb. 28Aug. 1 - Aug. 15
Alaska (AK)Days to Harvest: 70-95
• Alaska Red
• Allagash Russet
• Kennebec
• Alasclear
• Superior
• Shepody
• Alaska Frostless
• Denali
• Snowchip
• Alaska 114
• IditaRed
• Green Mountain
• Bake King
• Highlat Russet
• Yukon Gold
• Butte
• Lemhi Russet
Apr. 15 - Apr. 29
Arizona (AZ)Days to Harvest: 100-120
• Russet Norkotah
• Kennebec
• Irish Cobbler
• Katahdin
- Elevation -
[ 10 to 1000 feet ]
• Sept. 1 - Feb. 15

[ 1000 to 2000 feet ]
• Feb. 1 - Mar. 15

[ 2000 to 3000 feet ]
• Feb. 15 - May 1

[ 3000 to 4500 feet ]
• May 10 - June 1

[ 4500 to 6000 feet ]
• May 10 - June 1

[ Above 6000 feet ]
• May 15 - June 1
Arkansas (AR)Days to Harvest: 90-110
• Kennebec
• Irish Cobbler
• Pontiac
• Superior
• All Blue
• Yukon Gold
• Dark Red Norland
[ Northern AR ]
• Mar. 1 - April 7

[ Southern AR ]
• Feb. 1 - Mar. 7
• July 15 - Aug. 1
California (CA)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Carola
• Red Gold
• German Fingerling
[ Coastal Region ]
• Feb. 1 - Mar. 31

[ Inland Region ]
• Feb. 15 - Apr. 31
[ Coastal Region ]
• Aug. 15 - Sept. 30

[ Inland Region ]
• Aug. 15 - Sept. 30
Colorado (CO)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Russet Norkotahs
• Russet Nuggets
• Colorado Rose
• Rio Colorado
• Sangres
• Yukon Gold
• All-Blue
• Fingerlings
• Purple Majesty
Apr. 30 - May 14
Connecticut (CT)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Norland
• Irish Cobbler
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
• Russet Burbank
• Butte
• Red LaSoda
• Norgold M
Apr. 26 - May 10
Delaware (DE)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Dark Red Norland D
• Superior
• Eva
• Dakota Crisp
• Harley Blackwell
• Norkotah Russet
• Reba
• Yukon Gold
• Katahdin
• Marcy
• Norwis
Mar. 20 - Apr. 15
Florida (FL)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Pontiac
• Yukon Gold
• Gold Rush
[ North Florida ]
• Jan. 1 - Mar. 31

[ Central Florida ]
• Jan. 1 - Feb. 28
[ South Florida ]
• Sept. 1 - Jan. 31
Georgia (GA)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Pontiac
• Kennebac
• Atlantic
• Yukon Gold
Jan. 15 - Mar. 1
Hawaii (HI)Days to Harvest: 90-140
• Red Pontiac
• Bliss Triumph
• Red La Soda
• Kennebec
• Pele
• Waimea
• Red Pontiac
• Bliss Triumph
• Red La Soda
Oct. - Mar. 31
Idaho (ID)• Red Norland - 85
• Russet Norkotah - 85
• Yukon Gold - 90
May 10 - May 24
Illinois (IL)• Irish Cobbler - 100
• Norgold Russet - 100
• Norland - 105
• Superior - 105
• Red Lasoda - 110
• Red Pontiac - 110
• Katahdin - 120
• Kennebec - 120
Apr. 20 - May 4
Indiana (IN)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Dark Red Norland
• Red Norland
• Russet Norkotah
• Cascade
• Goldrush
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
• Red Pontiac
[ Northern Indiana ]
• Apr. 26 - May 10

[ Central Indiana ]
• Apr. 18 - May 2

[ Southern Indiana ]
• Apr. 3 - 17
Iowa (IA)Days to Harvest: 85-100
• Goldrush
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
• Red Norland
Apr. 1 - Apr. 20
Kansas (KS)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• LaRouge
• LaSoda
• Norland
• Purple Viking
• Norkotah
• Irish Cobbler
• Kennebec
• Superior
Mar. 15 - Apr. 20
Kentucky (KY)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Norgold
• Norkota
• Superior
• Kennebec
• Dark Red Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 15 - Apr. 29
Louisiana (LA)Days to Harvest: 90-120
• Red LaSoda
• Norland
• LaRouge
• Red Pontiac
• LaChipper
• Norchip
• Atlantic
• Kennebec
• LaBelle
• Yukon Gold
Jan. 20 - Feb. 28Aug. 15 - Sept. 10
Maine (ME)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Superior
• Red Pontiac
• Russet Burbank
• Caribe
• Yukon Gold
• Kennebec
• Red Norland
• All Blue
• Yellow Finn
May 6 - May 20
Maryland (MD)Days to Harvest: 65-80
• Blue
• Butte
• Caribe
• Gold Rush
• Irish Cobbler
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
• Norgold Russett
• Red Bison
• Red Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Rose Gold
• Yellow Finn
• Yukon Gold
Mar. 20 - May 10June 15 - July 10
Massachusetts (MA)Days to Harvest: 65-80
• Caribe
• Chippewa
• Irish Cobbler
• Sunrise
• Superior
• NewLeaf Superior
• Atlantic
• NewLeaf Atlantic
• Kennebec
• Norland
• Red LaSoda
• Red Pontiac
• BelRus
• Coastal Russet
• Katahdin
• Russet Burbank
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 7 - Apr. 21
Michigan (MI)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Boulder
• Jacqueline Lee
• Michigan Purple
• Missaukee
• Purple Haze
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 15 - May 31
Minnesota (MN)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Carola
• Gold Rush
• Kennebec
• Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Superior
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 30 - May 14
Mississippi (MS)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Norland
• Red LaSoda
• Red Pontiac
• Atlantic
• LaChipper
• Superior
• Norchip
Mar. 24 - Apr. 7
Missouri (MO)Days to Harvest: 70-85
• Irish Cobbler
• Kennebec
• Red Norland
• Dark Red Norland
• Redsen
• Red Pontiac
• Norgold Russet
• Russet Burbank
• Russet Norkotah
[ North Missouri ]
• Apr. 1 - Apr. 15

[ Central Missouri ]
• Mar. 20 - Apr. 10

[ South Missouri ]
• Mar. 10 - Mar. 30
Montana (MT)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Russet
June 20 - July 4
Nebraska (NE)Days to Harvest: 65-80
• Dark Red Norland
• Irish Cobbler
• Kennebec
• Red Pontiac
• Red Cloud
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 27 - May 11
Nevada (NV)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Russet
• Red Pontiac
• Red LaSota
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 1 - May 1
New Hampshire (NH)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Dark Red Norland
• Superior
• Chieftain
• Reba
• Salem
• Yukon Gold
• Elba
• Katahdin
• Adirondack Blue
• Adirondack Red
• French Fingerling
• German Butterball
May 20 - June 3
New Jersey (NJ)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Andover
• Dark Red Norland D
• Superior
• Atlantic
• Harley Blackwell
• King Harry
• Norkotah Russet
• Peter Wilcox
• Reba
• Yukon Gold
• Katahdin
• Lehigh
• Marcy
• Norwis
Mar. 20 - Apr. 25
New Mexico (NM)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• All Blue
• Caribe
• Cranberry Red
• Red Cloud
• Yukon Gold
[ North New Mexico ]
• May 22 - June 5

[ South New Mexico ]
• May 1 - May 15
New York (NY)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Dark Red Norland
• Superior
• Chieftain
• Reba
• Salem
• Yukon Gold
• Elba
• Katahdin
• Adirondack Blue
• Adirondack Red
• French Fingerling
• German Butterball
Apr. 1 -May 16
North Carolina (NC)Days to Harvest: 65-95
• Kennebec
• Red Pointiac
• Yukon Gold
• Superior
Feb. 15 - Apr. 1
North Dakota (ND)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Russet
May 14 - May 28
Ohio (OH)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Irish Cobbler
• Norland
• Pontiac
• Superior
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
Mar. 20 - May 15
Oklahoma (OK)Days to Harvest: 65-80
• Norland
• Red LaSoda
• Red Pontiac
• Irish Cobbler
• Kennebec
• Superior
• Yellow Finn
• Norgold Russet
• Norkota
Apr. 1 - Apr. 15
Oregon (OR)Days to Harvest: 65-80
• Red
• Red Pontiac
• Norland
• Red La Soda
• Cranberry Red
• Norgold Russet
• Russet Burbank
• Superior
• Yellow Finn
• Yukon Gold
• Bintje
• Desiree
• All Blue
[ Oregon Coast ]
• Feb. 1 - May 31

[ Western Valleys ]
• Apr. 1 - June 30

[ High Elevations ]
• May 1 - June 30

[ Columbia River Valley ]
• Mar. 1 - June 30
Pennsylvania (PA)Days to Harvest: 70-90
• Andover
• Michigan Purple
• Dark Red Norland D
• Superior
• Atlantic
• Chieftain
• Eva
• Kanona
• Kueka Gold
• NorDonna
• Norkotah Russet
• NYE 11-45
• Reba
• Yukon Gold
• Purple Majesty
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
• Lehigh
• Norwis
Mar. 25 - June 5
Rhode Island (RI)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Norland
• Irish Cobbler
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
Apr. 1 - May 1
South Carolina (SC)Days to Harvest: 100-120
• Irish Cobbler
• Red Pontiac
• Kennebec
• Yukon Gold
[ Piedmont ]
• Mar. 15 - Mar. 30

[ Central ]
• Feb. 20 - Mar. 10

[ Coastal ]
• Feb. 1 - Feb. 15
[ Piedmont ]
• July 1 - July 15

[ Central ]
• July 15 - July 30

[ Coastal ]
• July 15 - July 30
South Dakota (SD)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Russet Burbank
• Kennebec
• Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Superior
May 2 - May 16
Tennessee (TN)Days to Harvest: 65-95
• Kennebec
• Red Pointiac
• Yukon Gold
• Superior
Apr. 6 - Apr. 20
Texas (TX)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Dark Red Norland
• Norland
• Red LaSoda
• Viking
• Atlantic
• Gemchip
• Kennebec
• Superior
• Yukon Gold
• Century Russet
• Norgold M
• Russet Norkatah
[ Plant Hardiness Zone 6 ]
• Mar. 15 - Apr. 7

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 7 ]
• Mar. 10 - Apr. 1

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 8 ]
• Feb. 15 - Mar. 1

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 9A ]
• Jan .15 - Feb. 15

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 9B ]
• Jan. 1 - Feb. 1
[ Plant Hardiness Zone 6 ]
• Not Recommended

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 7 ]
• Aug. 1

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 8 ]
• Sept. 1

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 9A ]
• Oct. 1

[ Plant Hardiness Zone 9B ]
• Not Recommended
Utah (UT)• Kennebec -125
• Norgold Russett - 125
• Red Norland - 125
• Red Pointer - 125
• Russet Burbank - 125
Mar. 1 - May 1
Vermont (VT)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Dark Red Norland
• Superior
• Chieftain
• Reba
May 11 - May 25
Virginia (VA)• Steuben - 100
• Superior - 100
• Pontiac - 100
• Yukon gold - 112
Apr. 6 - Apr. 20
Washington (WA)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Russet
Apr. 15 - May 1
West Virginia (WV)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• Chieftain
• Katahdin
• Kennebec
• Norlan
Apr. 22 - May 6
Wisconsin (WI)Days to Harvest: 65-120
• Chieftain
• Dark Red Norland
• Red LaSoda
• Red Pontiac
• Rideau
• Sangre
• Freedom Russett
• Burbank Russett
• Norkotah
• All Blue
• French Fingerling
• Princess La Ratte
• Russian Banana
• Kennebec
• Onaway
• Superior
• Carola
• German Butterball
• Granola
• Nicola
• Yukon Gold
Apr. 15 - May 15
Wyoming (WY)Days to Harvest: 65-90
• All Blue
• Early Ohio
• Kennebec
• Norland
• Red Pontiac
• Yukon Gold
May 1 - May 26